2013 insecurity

Thirty-nine international workers and one security guard die in a hostage crisis at a natural gas facility near In Aménas, Algeria, January 16–20.

North Korea showed its teeth to the West and conducted its third underground nuclear test, prompting widespread condemnation and tightened economic sanctions from the international community.

Terrorism has never been out of the world. So in Spring two Chechen Islamist brothers exploded two bombs at the Boston Marathon in Boston, Massachusetts, in the United States, killing 3 and injuring 264 others.

You called it a “farce” or the 2013 soap opera, but people could find enough jokes in the many scandals which came into the light by American Edward Snowden who disclosed operations engaged by a US government mass surveillance program to news publications and had to flee the country as a traitor and dangerous person for the United states of America. He was later being granted temporary asylum in Russia.

Despite President Obama’s claims that these programs have congressional oversight, members of Congress were unaware of the existence of these NSA programs or the secret interpretation of the Patriot Act, and have consistently been denied access to basic information about them.

When the news broke identifying NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, the tweets calling him a hero outweighed those calling him a traitor nearly 30-1, according to data from Topsy.

Between the news breaking revealing Edward Snowden as the source of the NSA leak on Sunday, June 9 and Monday, June 10, Topsy found that tweets about Snowden were predominantly positive, per their sentiment analysis.

Topsy sentiment score has a range of 0-100 with 50 being neutral.

In late December, 2013, U.S. District Judge William Pauley ruled that the NSA’s collection of telephone records is legal and valuable in the fight against terrorism. In his opinion, he wrote, “a bulk telephony metadata collection program [is] a wide net that could find and isolate gossamer contacts among suspected terrorists in an ocean of seemingly disconnected data” and noted that a similar collection of data prior to 9/11 might have prevented the attack. {Wikipedia}

China was behind the recent Autumn cyber-attacks on the Belgian prime minister’s office and the ministry of foreign affairs, according to a report from the intelligence services. The office of state security said it would continue monitoring the activities of the Chinese closely. The government has not yet issued a response to the report.

In August Flemish minister-president Kris Peeters said that the region suspended all arms exports to problem areas of the Middle East and Africa in February 2011. The areas concerned include Egypt, as well as Bahrain, Syria and Yemen. In addition, he said, Flanders adheres to international arms embargoes against Libya, Lebanon and Iran. The Flemish government’s measures go further than the steps taken by a special EU foreign affairs council held in Brussels last week, Peeters said.

Two suspects aged 17 and 21 have been arrested in august, in connection with the creation of Facebook pages earlier this year featuring photos of young women accompanied by insulting comments, the Ghent prosecutor said. Investigators received the assistance of Facebook and Microsoft in tracking down those responsible. “The message is that culprits will be identified sooner or later and will be pursued,” said spokesperson An Schoonjans.

Stepping Toes - About Nov. 14 11.32On Sunday October the 6th of the year 2013 the Christadelphians got to know that Xanga had stopped their services of offering a free Blog webservice. Previously they had to cope already with Multiply stopping its services and now unexpectedly the Xanga website “Stepping Toes” had disappeared. With Xanga, at first we could not reach our previous postings. Afterwards when we got them back most of the writings were of no use because the articles related to other blogs on Xanga, from other writers which also saw their blogs finished.

The change from Multiply and from Xanga to WordPress had brought a lot of work for me, having to transpose the messages and taking care that links would work again. But in Xanga it was of no use to keep the old messages, so I tried to restart the Christian lifestyle internet magazine “Stepping Toes” from zero, and I am still looking for contributors for it.

Over the last decade, social media monitoring has become a primary form of business intelligence, used to identify, predict, and respond to consumer behaviour. i also am aware of the role of social media and started having the published blogs being placed on those media. But I am also aware of the need to listen to what my readers or customers, competitors, critics, and supporters are saying about my different blogs. My ears are open, so if you feel called to give me some advice, that would always be welcome.

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About Marcus Ampe

Retired dancer, choreographer, choreologist Founder of the Dance impresario office and archive: Danscontact-Dansarchief plus the Association for Bible scholars, the Lifestyle magazines "Stepping Toes" and "From Guestwriters" and creator of the site "Messiah for all". - Gepensioneerd danser, choreograaf, choreoloog. Stichter van Danscontact-Dansarchief plus van de Vereniging voor Bijbelvorsers, de Lifestyle magazines "Stepping Toes" en "From Guestwriters" en maker van de site "Messiah for all".
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5 Responses to 2013 insecurity

  1. Pingback: People of 2013 | Marcus' s Space

  2. Pingback: 2013-2014 Money to be put on hold or to be used | Marcus' s Space

  3. Pingback: 2013 Lifestyle, religiosity and spirituality | Marcus' s Space

  4. Pingback: Illusion of Separateness | From guestwriters

  5. Pingback: Belgian Christadelphians 2013 & 2014 in review | Free Christadelphians: Belgian Ecclesia Brussel - Leuven

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