Battling Borshct in Ukraine

The largely untested interim team that took power in Kiev just a week ago braced for Moscow’s first possible invasion of a neighbour since a brief 2008 confrontation with Georgia by putting its military on full combat alert on Saturday.
Ukraine‘s navy chief announced he had switched allegiance to the pro-Russian authorities of the flashpoint peninsula of Crimea, a day after he was appointed to the post by interim leader Oleksandr Turchynov.

“I swear to execute the orders of the (pro-Russia) commander-in-chief of the Autonomous Republic of Crimea,”

Denis Berezovsky said in a televised statement from inside the Crimean headquarters of the Russian Black Sea Fleet, adding that he

“swears allegiance to the residents of the Autonomous Republic of Crimea”.

Ukraine and Crimea seem to be looking for their mother and are in danger to loose track of their children.

To say Ukraine is on the brink of disaster is perhaps to strong language and not believing in the people of the nation who could join forces and give hands perhaps to more than one superpower, because why should they have only opportunity to join either the north or the south west?

To remember:

If Crimea was the jewel in the Soviet crown then Ukraine was cradled as the bread basket.

+

To cut the Ukrainian pie, is to explore the ethnic divide in the city that was mainly a consequence of Stalinist Russia, where Crimean tartars (Turkic Muslims) were sent off to Central Asia and Crimea was “gifted” to Ukraine in 1954.

+

The present crisis with Russia invading Crimea is a re-telling of the 2004 Orange Revolution followed by the 2008 situation, when Russia invaded Georgia with its tanks. This policy choice is in the present context of Ukraine turning pro-West, post the European Union’s extension of a hand to Ukraine by offering the Association Agreement. This agreement did not pass as Putin tried his best to secure former President Yanukovych’s confidence in Russian sphere of influence.

+++

  • Ukraine navy chief switches allegiance to Crimea pro-Russia authorities (terminalx.org)
    Armed men that Kiev believes are backed by Moscow have since seized key government buildings in the region and surrounded Ukrainian military bases, and Russia´s parliament on Saturday approved the deployment of troops into the country.It is unclear why and how Berezovsky switched his allegiance, but Crimea´s newly appointed pro-Russia prime minister Sergiy Aksyonov, who is not recognised by Kiev, said the announcement was a “historic event” at a joint press conference with the navy chief.
  • Head of Ukraine’s navy defects to pro-Russian Crimea (wchildblog.com)
    Ukraine’s acting president, Oleksandr Turchynov, fired his new navy commander on Sunday for “high treason” after the admiral pledged allegiance to pro-Russian forces in Crimea, a Ukrainian news agency reported.Earlier in the day, Adm. Denis Berezovsky appeared in public in Sevastopol in the company of Crimea’s newly elected pro-Moscow premier, Sergei Aksenov, and pledged allegiance to his administration.“I, Denis Berezovsky, swear an oath of allegiance to the residents of the republic of Crimea,” Berezovsky said in televised remarks. “I swear to fulfill my military duty with dignity, to bravely protect lives and freedom of the residents of Crimea and the city of Sevastopol.”
  • Ukraine navy chief switches allegiance (skynews.com.au)
    It is unclear why and how Berezovsky switched his allegiance, but Crimea’s newly appointed pro-Russia prime minister Sergiy Aksyonov, who is not recognised by Kiev, said the announcement was a ‘historic event’ at a joint press conference with the navy chief.
  • Ukraine in full army mobilisation (nation.com.pk)
    As world leaders held urgent meetings on the crisis, pro-Moscow gunmen were controlling large swathes of the rugged Black Sea peninsula that has housed Kremlin navies since the 18th century.
    Witnesses said Russian soldiers had also blocked about 400 Ukrainian marines at their base in the eastern Crimean port city of Feodosiya and were calling on them to surrender and give up their weapons.
    The largely untested interim team that took power in Kiev just a week ago braced for Moscow’s first possible invasion of a neighbour since a brief 2008 confrontation with Georgia by putting its military on full combat alert on Saturday.
  • Russia’s power play in Ukraine escalates (latimes.com)
    The United States accused Moscow of reinforcing an estimated 6,000 ground and naval troops in Crimea with additional personnel and announced that Secretary of State John F. Kerry would  fly to Kiev, Ukraine’s capital, on Tuesday in a show of support for the beleaguered Ukrainian government.The demand that Ukrainian troops surrender, read on television by the new head of Crimea’s regional government, appeared to be aimed at consolidating Russia’s hold on the peninsula, which is home to the Black Sea fleet and the largest ethnic Russian community in this former Soviet republic.

    There was little evidence that Ukrainian military forces, whose bases have been blocked off by Russian troops, were heeding the order to give up their weapons and abandon their posts.

    However, the cohesion and loyalty of Ukraine’s armed forces were called into doubt when the commander of the navy defected to the side of Crimea’s new premier, Sergei Aksenov.

  • Ukraine Navy chief defects to Crimea (therebel.org)
    “The Duma Council adopted an appeal to the president of Russia, in which parliamentarians are calling on the president to take measures to stabilize the situation in Crimea and use all available means to protect the people of the Crimea from tyranny and violence,” Lower House Speaker Sergey Naryshkin said.
  • Ukraine’s New Navy Head Defects to Crimea (breitbart.com)
    The BBC live blog reported Ukraine’s prosecutor general is now investigating Berezovsky for high treason. Interim President Oleksandr Turchynov chose Serhiy Haiduk as acting commander of the Ukrainian Navy.Gunmen and Russian soldiers surrounded at least two Ukraine military bases in Crimea. Prime Minister Arsent Yatseniuk ordered full military mobilization for war.
  • Ukraine navy chief switches allegiance to Crimea pro-Russia authorities (dailystar.com.lb)
Enhanced by Zemanta

cultura {the geopolitics cookbook}

Mother Russia poetry majestic
tells the time of a great empire
Turning round the old man ponders
Reminiscing an age gone by

Mother Russia
Dance of the tsars
Hold up your heads
Remember who you are
Can you release
the anger, the grief
Can you be happy
Now your people are free ?

Few would remember Iron Maiden’s rendition to Soviet Russia in their iconic anthem, “Mother Russia”. With the implosion of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), many former satellite states emerged jubilant and resolute to stick to the promise of self-determination and steer their countries from political disaster. Such is Ukraine’s national anthem that vows to stand up against any power to save the nation. By understanding the recipe of the Soviet Russia’s policies towards Ukraine and Crimea in the 20th Century, one can gain a better understanding of the turmoil unfolding today in the 21st.

On visiting…

View original post 898 more words

About Marcus Ampe

Retired dancer, choreographer, choreologist Founder of the Dance impresario office and archive: Danscontact-Dansarchief plus the Association for Bible scholars, the Lifestyle magazines "Stepping Toes" and "From Guestwriters" and creator of the site "Messiah for all". - Gepensioneerd danser, choreograaf, choreoloog. Stichter van Danscontact-Dansarchief plus van de Vereniging voor Bijbelvorsers, de Lifestyle magazines "Stepping Toes" en "From Guestwriters" en maker van de site "Messiah for all".
This entry was posted in History, News and Politics, Thoughts of others and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Battling Borshct in Ukraine

  1. Marcus Ampe says:

    Russia has said China is largely “in agreement” over Ukraine, after other world powers condemned Moscow for sending troops into the country.

    Hundreds of Russian soldiers have surrounded a military base in Crimea, preventing Ukrainian soldiers from going in or out.

    The convoy blockading the site, near the Crimean capital Simferopol, includes at least 17 military vehicles.

    http://news.sky.com/story/1219922/russia-and-china-in-agreement-over-ukraine

    Like

  2. Marcus Ampe says:

    The Foreign Secretary William Hague is in #Ukraine , he held talks in #Kyiv with Acting President Turchynov and Prime Minister Yatsenyuk and this morning he spoke to people in the #Maidan .

    You can listen to William Hague’s comments on the situation in Ukraine here: http://ow.ly/uaNN5

    Like

  3. Marcus Ampe says:

    America and Europe have, according to the financial Times, few real tools to limit Mr Putin’s troop movements and prevent him from destabilising the rest of a poor, divided and weak Ukraine. That leaves only one real option: to follow a persistent diplomatic strategy to outmanoeuvre Mr Putin in a lengthy struggle over Ukraine.

    Professor Nicholas Burns, Harvard’s Kennedy School and former undersecretary of state writes in the Financial Times:

    Mr Putin chose this fight on ground familiar and advantageous to him. He won round one and is still on the move. But it is not clear if even he knows how the crisis may end. And his blunt use of force will not play well with the majority of Ukrainians or the world beyond.

    The struggle for Ukraine is shaping up to be the kind of contest for power with the Russians that cold war US presidents managed so effectively. Advantage in such a long, twisting contest should shift, in the end, to the stronger, more mature and democratic governments. Mr Putin’s Russia is not among them.

    Like

  4. Pingback: A Plan spoken of in long past times | Marcus' s Space

  5. Pingback: 70 years later | Marcus Ampe's Space

Feel free to react - Voel vrij om te reageren

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s